Survey of some Medicinally Valued Plants found in Vidharbh Region of Washim District.

 

Sul S. R*, Shaikh K. B, Pandhare Y. L, Dr. Kale V. M., Nagansurkar S.

MUP’S Institute of Pharmacy (D-pharm), Pundalik Nagar Degaon (Risod), Dist-Washim, MS (India)-444506

*Corresponding Author E-mail: sandeshsul90@gmail.com

 

ABSTRACT:

About the 80% population of the developing world is still dependent upon the traditional medicine available in their surrounding i.e. vegetation/forest to meet their demand, rely on medicinal plants because of their effectiveness, no side effects, adverse effect, and economically chief. In Vidharbha region lot of tribal peoples live in forest area and they go to vaidus, Hakims.Vaidus and Hakims using the natural remedies for treatingthe various diseases. Tribal peoples use traditional herbal formulations to treat common ailments despite the availability of the modern pharmaceutical drugs in the nearby towns and cities. This traditional knowledge is hardly communicated to vaidus and Hakims. This knowledge must be recorded, documented and an attempt to establish scientific correlation should be made.The current ethnomedical survey is aimed to identify, collect about 33 plants used by local triable people to treat ailments like wound healing in case of DiabetesMellitus and respiratory disorders like asthma, bronchitis, cough, breathlessness, Tuberculosis along with these plants are used for the treatment in piles, epilepsy, neuralgia, psoriasis, rheumatism, abortifacient, anthelmintic, cardiotonic carminative and digestive. The information pooled from this survey can be further used for establishing the scientific data pertaining to these claims. If such claims are proven scientifically standardized method can be developed for the reliable and reproducible use of these remedies.

 

KEYWORDS: Respiratory Disorders, COP Degaon, Medicinal plants, Vaidus and Hakims, Adulsa.

 

 


INTRODUCTION:

From the time immemorial, man has been dependent on plants as medicine. About the 80% population of the developing world is still dependent upon the traditional medicine available in their surrounding i.e. vegetation/forest to meet their demand, rely on medicinal plants because of their effectiveness, lack of modern healthcare alternative. (1)

 

The major part of the district is predominantly inhabited by rural population. However, there are few tribal pockets scattered in this region. The tribal inhabitants like Bhils, Korku, Gond, Takonkar, Andh, Mathuralabhan and others form small pockets in this district. These tribal peoples use traditional herbal formulations to treat common ailments despite the availability of the modern pharmaceutical drugs in the nearby towns and cities. The district has largely remained unexplored with regards to its studies on medicinal plants considering lack of such reports documentation of traditional medicines and healthcare system among tribal communities and experienced elderly village people in the Washim district was undertaken. The present study is thus an attempt to document different plant species that are used by the tribal communities of Washim district, Maharashtra against respiratory diseases.Washim District in Maharashtra is a relatively newly formed district that was created on 1st July 1998. The district is located in the Vidharbha Region of Maharashtra, India. The entire district occupies an area of about 5150 sq. kilometer. The geographical coordinates of Washim District are 76° 7' East Longitude and 19° 61' North Latitude. The Washim District Map shows that this district is surrounded by Akola, Amravati, Buldhana and Yavatmal districts. The temperature varies from 9 oC to 45 oC and the annual rainfall is about 832 mm, housing pockets of deciduous forests rich in medicinal plants.The present study is thus an attempt to document different plant varieties that are used by the communities of Washim district, Maharashtra in wound healing and respiratory disease treatments.

 

 

 

METHODOLOGY:

The survey of tribal villages in Washim district was conducted during 2015-2016. Frequent field visits were given to established report with herbal healers of the region. The information about the medicinal plants used by the local peoples of Washim district in wound healing was obtained from tribesmen, local vaidus and medicinal herb stores. The collected information was mainly related to plant parts used with quantity and vernacular names. The plants were collected and identified technically. Voucher specimens were collected, processed as per routine herbarium methods and identification of collected plant material was done either in the field itself or in laboratory following the district and state floras (2) given accession number and deposited in the Botany Department, Bhartiya Mahavidyalaya, Amravati. The parts of plants used for Respiratory diseases and wound healing property of medicinal preparations vary from leaves, stem barks, seeds, roots, fruits and flowers respectively as mentioned in Table No 1.and Table No 2.

 


Table 1: List of the Ethno-Medicinal Plants Used Against Respiratory Diseases

Sr. No

Drug Name

Botanical Name

Family

Part Used

01

Adulsa

Adhatoda vasica Ness.

Acanthaceae

Leaves

02

Aghada

Achranthes aspera L.

Amaranthaceae

Roots, leaves

03

Arjun

Terminalia arjuna (Roxb.) Wight & Arn

Combretaceae

Stem Bark

04

Arjun Sadhada

Terminalia bellerica Roxb.

Combretaceae

Stem Bark, Fruit

05

Bhuiringani

Solanum xanthocarpum

Solanaceae

Fruit

06

Bibba

Semecarpus anacardium L.

Anacardiaceae

Nut

07

Bija

Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb.

Fabaceae

Gum

08

Bilayat

Argemone mexicna L.

Papaveraceae

Seeds

09

DamaWel

Tylophora asthmatica W & A

Asclepiadaceae

Leaves

10

Halad

Curcuma longa L.

Zingberaceae

Rhizome

11

Kal-lavi

Gloriosa superba L.

Liliaceae

Tuber

12

Kala Dhatura

Datura metel L.

Solanaceae

Leaves

13

Pan-onwa

Coleus ambonicus Lour.

Lamiaceae

Leaves

14

Punarnava

Boerhaavia diffussa L.

Nyctaginaceae

Whole plant

15

Tulsi

Ocimum sanctum L.

Lamiaceae

Leaves

 

Table: 2 List of the Medicinal plants used for Wound healing.

Sr. No

Drug Name

Botanical Name

Family

Part Used

01

Adrak

Zingiber officinale Rosc.

Zingiberaceae

Rhizome

02

Aghada

Achyranthes aspera L.

Amranthaceae

Leaves

03

Aloe

Aloe vera L.

Liliaceae

Leaf juice

04

Arjun

Terminalia arjuna Roxb.

Combretacea

Bark

05

Ashwagandha

Withania somifera Dunal.

Solanaceae

Root & seed

06

Awala

Phyllanthus emblica L.

Euphorbiaceae

Whole plant

07

Erand

Ricinus communis L.

Euphorbiaceae

Whole plant

08

Guggule

Commiphora mukul Hook

Burseraceae

Whole plant

09

Halad

Curcuma longa L.

Zingiberaceae

Rhizome & seed

10

Kal-lawi

Gloroisa superba L.

Liliaceae

Leaves

11

Kaneri

Nerium indicum mill.

Apocyanaceae

Leaves

12

Khair

Acacia catechu Willd

Mimosaceae

Bark

13

Kuppi

Acalpha indica L.

Euphorbiaceae

Whole plant

14

Mehdi

Lawsonia innermis alba L.

Lythraceae

Leaves, seed, bark & flowers

15

Mohari

Brassica juncea L

Brassicaceae

Fruits

16

Neem

Azadirachta indica Juss.

Meliaceae

Leaves

17

Bilayat

Argemone maxicana L.

Papavaraceae

Leaves & Latex

18

Tulsi

Ocimum sanctum L.

Labiatae

Leaves

 


 

 

RESULT AND DISCUSSION:

A total number of 33 plant species have been recorded used in the treatment for respiratory diseases and wound healing. The parts utilized are listed in the table No.1 and table No.2. The list mentioned is as a representation of preliminary works, an exhaustive list will be finalized within a span of 3 years of survey and sampling.

 

We have presented such plants which are extensively used in traditional medicine of India and have been ethno-botanical references corroborate oral information from local tribesmen/ vaidus.

 

Although traditional medicines offer a safe, inexpensive approach to treatment of wounds and burns, it has not received adequate attention.

 

There are a number of plants which have been reported for their wound healing activity. Most of these studies involve random screening of plant or extracts for wound healing activity, while some of the plants enumerated in Table No. 1 have been pharmacologically validated for their wound healing activity viz. Aloe vera(3,4), Azadirachta indica (5), Caricapapaya(6), Curcuma longa(7), Ocimum sanctum(8), Phyllanthus emblica(9), Terminalia arjuna(10).

 

A number of secondary metabolites / active compounds isolated from plants have been demonstrated in animal models (in vivo) as active principles responsible for facilitating healing of wounds. Some of the most important ones include tannins from Terminalia arjuna(10), glycoprotein fraction from Aloe vera(11).

 

Among the different plant parts documented and utilized, highest proportion (37.78%) was of leaves, followed by whole plant (16 %), bark (13.33%), fruit (8.9%), seeds (8.9%), root (6.67%), rhizome (4.44%), flower (2.22%) and peels (2.22%) depicted in the figure 1.

 

The oil obtained from dried fruits of Semecarpusanacardium applied over newly wounded area of thebody to avoid water contact, sealing the surface and helps in wound healing. During the survey it was also noted that besides wound healing properties Semecarpusanacardiumis also used for obtainingblack dye and a source of natural dye.

 

CommiphoraMukul is also used as incense and as a fixative in perfumery. Besides wound healing properties, some plants are poisonous too e.g. Gloroisa superba, Calotropisprocera, Withaniasomnifera. Withania somnifera also widely used for curingdiabetes and ailments in addition to wound healing. Zingiberofficinale and Curcuma longa belongs tofamilyZingiberaceae are most commonly used for their medicinal value. Traditionally, the paste from the rhizomes are applied as a remedy for inflamed joints and sprains along with wounds, bruises.(12) Calotropisprocera leaves are smoked to cure asthma and cough, the latex is commonly used for ringworm, dog bites thorn injuries, skin diseases and in tanning industry. Lawsoniainnnermisalbaseeds of the herb are used indysentery. Bark of the herb is used in jaundice. Henna leaves are used in baldness and prickly heat powder. Henna leaves are used in boils and burns. Used in hair dyes, oil is used in perfume industry.

 

These findings give credence to the traditional medicinal application of the plant as remedies for measles, internal and external wounds and infections.

 

CONCLUSION:

This investigation will assist in making information available on how these drugs obtained from medicinal plants are prepared and administered. Further pharmacological and clinical studies on these plants may provide effective natural medicines for various respiratory disorders.

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:

The authors are thankful to Dr. V. M. Kale, Principal MUP’S Institute of Pharmacy, Degaon and Mr. Y. L. Pandhare, HOD MUP’S Institute of Pharmacy, Degaon for providing various facilities and financial support to carry out this work.

 

REFERENCES:

1.       Arjun Ram et al.Medicinalplants from Siddha System of medicine useful for treating respiratory diseases. International Journal of Pharmaceutical Analysis.2009; 1(2): 20-30.

2.       Mohammad Yaheya Mohammed Ismail Antiasthmatic herbal drugs. A review. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2010; 2(3):11-15.

3.       Naik VN Flora of Marathwada. Amrut Prakashan, Aurangabad. 1998.

4.       Patil G. et al.Folkremedies used against respiratory disorders in Jalgaon District, Maharashtra. NaturalProduct Radiance.2008; 7(4): 354-358.

5.       Taur DJ and Patil RYSome medicinal plants with Antiasthmatic potential: a current status. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine.2011; 3(6): 413-418.

6.       Sandhya B. et al. Ethnomedicinal Plants used by the Valaiyan Community of Pairanmalai Hills (Reserved Forest), Tamilnadu, India- A Pilot Study, African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines. 2006; 3(1):101-114.

7.       Caniago I. and Siebert S., Medicinal plants ecology, knowledge and conservation in Kalimantan, Indonesia, Eco. Bot.1998:229-250.

8.       Heggers JP et al. Beneficial effect of Aloe on wound healing in an excision wound model. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 1996; 2:271–277.

9.       Davis RH et al. Wound healing. Oral and topical activity of Aloe vera. Journal American Podiatric Medical Association. 1989; 79:559–562.

10.     Bharadwaj RL. and Sharma DN Evaluation of neem (Azadirachta indica Juss) oil as a potent wound healer. Histomorphology and histochemical study. Indian Veterinary Medical Journal. 1997; 21:187–190.

11.     Mikhalchik EV et al. Wound-healing effect of papaya-based preparation in experimental thermal trauma. Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine.2004; 137:560–562.

12.     Mehra KS et al. Curcuma longa (Linn) drops in corneal wound healing Tokai. Journal Experimental Clinical Medicine.1984; 9:27-31.

 

 

 

 

 

Received on 30.11.2017       Modified on 08.01.2018

Accepted on 09.03.2018       ©A&V Publications All right reserved

Res.  J. Pharmacognosy and Phytochem. 2018; 10(2): 168-170.

DOI: 10.5958/0975-4385.2018.00025.0